Episode Guide

These are all of the episodes of The Merlin Show, to date. Click the title for more information and to download each episode for free.

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020: Interview: Jesse Thorn, Part 2

Merlin talks with The Sound of Young America’s Jesse Thorn about how podcasts let him engage with a wider audience, the greying of public radio’s average listener, and how radio can be programmed to become almost unnoticeable.

Note: This is the second segment in our six-part interview with Jesse Thorn. Don’t miss the other segments.

019: Interview: Jesse Thorn, Part 1

Merlin talks with The Sound of Young America’s Jesse Thorn about his roots in radio at UC-Santa Cruz and how having to borrow his Mom’s car led to him putting his radio shows on the web. We also learn some surprising things that Jesse has in common with basketball superstar, Manute Bol.

Note: This is the first segment in our six-part interview with Jesse Thorn. Stop back soon for more.

018: Interview: John Roderick, Part 4

In the final episode of Merlin’s talk with John Roderick, Hotrod explains the difficulties of getting good at guitar, the perils of self-producing a record, and Ken Stringfellow’s habit of punching-in vocals, three words at a time.

Pick quote: “The Wrens made a whole career out of an ADAT and a 12-pack.”

Note: This is the final segment of a our epic 4-part interview with John Roderick; don’t miss part one, part two and part three.

017: Interview: John Roderick, Part 3

Merlin talks with John Roderick, the singer and songwriter for “The Long Winters” (and the man behind The Merlin Show’s theme song, “Blue Diamonds”). John and Merlin discuss string art, learning how to play guitar, and the surprising achievability of most people’s dreams.

Note: This is the third segment of our 4-part interview with John Roderick; don’t miss part one, part two, and part four.

016: Interview: John Roderick, Part 2

Merlin talks with John Roderick, the singer and songwriter behind “The Long Winters” (and the man behind The Merlin Show’s theme song, “Blue Diamonds”). John and Merlin discuss the myths of celebrity, bullshit, and the problem of Ben Affleck’s hair.

Note: This is the second segment of our 4-part interview with John Roderick; don’t miss part one, part three, and part four.

015: Interview: Peter Hughes, Part 2

Merlin talks with Peter Hughes of The Mountain Goats about building a sustainable career in independent music, how prolific recording and touring keeps the lights on, and how having the right fan base (and a little bit of luck) makes all the difference.

014: Interview: John Vanderslice, Part 3

Merlin talks with San Francisco indie rocker (and longtime Mac user) John Vanderslice about how he manages his fan email list, as well as JV’s tips on taking a Mac on tour, and how internet access in Australia can be like a vibrating bed. Bonus footage includes the video for John’s song “Exodus Damage.”

Note: This is the third segment of a 3-part interview with JV; don’t miss part one and part two

013: Interview: Chris Wetherell, Part 2

Merlin talks with Google’s Chris Wetherell about working from the road, the surprisingly modest stakes of touring, opportunity costs, and failing utterly at email.

Note: This is the second segment of a 2-part interview with Chris; don’t miss part one

012: Interview: John Roderick

Merlin talks with John Roderick, the singer and songwriter behind “The Long Winters” (and the man behind The Merlin Show’s theme song, “Blue Diamonds”). John curses at on-set hippies, wonders about making money on the web, and demands that indie rockers learn to behave more like building contractors. Roffle, roffle, roffle. (Contains PG-13 language, ribald exchanges, and frank discussion of show business [“it’s not ‘show friend…’”])

Note: This is the first segment of our 4-part interview with John Roderick; don’t miss part two, part three, and part four.

011: Interview: Peter Hughes

In today’s episode, Merlin talks with Peter Hughes of The Mountain Goats about the logistics of wired touring, keeping a tour diary on LiveJournal, and why The Mountain Goats don’t have a MySpace page.